October 30, 2013

Glassbeam instantiates a lot of trends

Glassbeam checked in recently, and they turn out to exemplify quite a few of the themes I’ve been writing about. For starters:

Glassbeam basics include:

All Glassbeam customers except one are SaaS/cloud (Software as a Service), and even that one was only offered a subscription (as oppose to perpetual license) price.

So what does Glassbeam’s technology do? Glassbeam says it is focused on “machine data analytics,” specifically for the “Internet of Things”, which it distinguishes from IT logs.* Specifically, Glassbeam sells to manufacturers of complex devices — IT (most of its sales so far ), medical, automotive (aspirational to date), etc. — and helps them analyze “phone home” data, for both support/customer service and marketing kinds of use cases. As of a recent release, the Glassbeam stack can: Read more

February 13, 2013

It’s hard to make data easy to analyze

It’s hard to make data easy to analyze. While everybody seems to realize this — a few marketeers perhaps aside — some remarks might be useful even so.

Many different technologies purport to make data easy, or easier, to an analyze; so many, in fact, that cataloguing them all is forbiddingly hard. Major claims, and some technologies that make them, include:

*Complex event/stream processing terminology is always problematic.

My thoughts on all this start:  Read more

November 5, 2012

Real-time confusion

I recently proposed a 2×2 matrix of BI use cases:

Let me now introduce another 2×2 matrix of analytic scenarios:

My point is that there are at least three different cool things people might think about when they want their analytics to be very fast:

There’s also one slightly boring one that however drives a lot of important applications: Read more

August 24, 2012

Hadoop notes: Informatica, Splunk, and IBM

Informatica, Splunk, and IBM are all public companies, and correspondingly reticent to talk about product futures. Hence, anything I might suggest about product futures from any of them won’t be terribly detailed, and even the vague generalities are “the Good Lord willin’ an’ the creek don’ rise”.

Never let a rising creek overflow your safe harbor.

Anyhow:

1. Hadoop can be an awesome ETL (Extract/Transform/Load) execution engine; it can handle huge jobs and perform a great variety of transformations. (Indeed, MapReduce was invented to run giant ETL jobs.) Thus, if one offers a development-plus-execution stack for ETL processes, it might seem appealing to make Hadoop an ETL execution option. And so:

Informatica told me about other interesting Hadoop-related plans as well, but I’m not sure my frieNDA allows me to mention them at all.

IBM, however, is standing aside. Specifically, IBM told me that it doesn’t see the point of doing the same thing, as its ETL engine — presumably derived from the old Ascential product line — is already parallel and performant enough.

2. Last year, I suggested that Splunk and Hadoop are competitors in managing machine-generated data. That’s still true, but Splunk is also preparing a Hadoop co-opetition strategy. To a first approximation, it’s just Hadoop import/export. However, suppose you view Splunk as offering a three-layer stack: Read more

May 3, 2012

Big Data hype?

A reporter wrote in to ask whether investor interest in “Big Data” was justified or hype. (More precisely, that’s how I reinterpreted his questions. :) ) His examples were Splunk’s IPO, Teradata’s stock price increase, and Birst’s financing. In a nutshell:

1. A great example of hype is that anybody is calling Birst a “Big Data” or “Big Data analytics” company. If anything, Birst is a “little data” analytics company that claims, as a differentiating feature, that it can handle ordinary-sized data sets as well. Read more

January 10, 2012

Splunk update

Splunk is announcing the Splunk 4.3 point release. Before discussing it, let’s recall a few things about Splunk, starting with:

As in any release, a lot of Splunk 4.3 is about “Oh, you didn’t have that before?” features and Bottleneck Whack-A-Mole performance speed-up. One performance enhancement is Bloom filters, which are a very hot topic these days. More important is a switch from Flash to HTML5, so as to accommodate mobile devices with less server-side rendering. Splunk reports that its users — especially the non-IT ones — really want to get Splunk information on the tablet devices. While this somewhat contradicts what I wrote a few days ago pooh-poohing mobile BI, let me hasten to point out:

That’s pretty much the ideal scenario for mobile BI: Timeliness matters and prettiness doesn’t.

Read more

January 8, 2012

Big data terminology and positioning

Recently, I observed that Big Data terminology is seriously broken. It is reasonable to reduce the subject to two quasi-dimensions:

given that

But the conflation should stop there.

*Low-volume/high-velocity problems are commonly referred to as “event processing” and/or “streaming”.

When people claim that bigness and structure are the same issue, they oversimplify into mush. So I think we need four pieces of terminology, reflective of a 2×2 matrix of possibilities. For want of better alternatives, my suggestions are:

Read more

October 10, 2011

Text data management, Part 1: Confusion

This is Part 1 of a three post series. The posts cover:

  1. Confusion about text data management.
  2. Choices for text data management (general and short-request).
  3. Choices for text data management (analytic).

There’s much confusion about the management of text data, among technology users, vendors, and investors alike. Reasons seems to include:

Above all: The use cases for text data vary greatly, just as the use cases for simply-structured databases do.

There are probably fewer people now than there were six years ago who need to be told that text and relational database management are very different things. Other misconceptions, however, appear to be on the rise. Specific points that are commonly overlooked include: Read more

July 27, 2011

MongoDB users and use cases

I spoke with Eliot Horowitz and Max Schierson of 10gen last month about MongoDB users and use cases. The biggest clusters they came up with weren’t much over 100 nodes, but clusters an order of magnitude bigger were under development. The 100 node one we talked the most about had 33 replica sets, each with about 100 gigabytes of data, so that’s in the 3-4 terabyte range total. In general, the largest MongoDB databases are 20-30 TB; I’d guess those really do use the bulk of available disk space.   Read more

July 26, 2011

Remote machine-generated data

I refer often to machine-generated data, which is commonly generated inexpensively and in log-like formats, and is often best aggregated in a big bit bucket before you try to do much analysis on it. The term has caught on, to the point that perhaps it’s time to distinguish more carefully among different kinds of machine-generated data. In particular, I think it may be useful to distinguish between:

Here’s what I’m thinking of for the second category. I rather frequently hear of cases in which data is generated by large numbers of remote machines, which occasionally send messages home. For example:  Read more

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