Amazon and its cloud

Analysis of Amazon’s role in database and analytic technology, especially via the S3/EC2 cloud computing initiative. Also covered are SimpleDB and Amazon’s role as a technology user. Related subjects include:

April 29, 2013

More on Actian/ParAccel/VectorWise/Versant/etc.

My quick reaction to the Actian/ParAccel deal was negative. A few challenges to my views then emerged. They didn’t really change my mind.

Amazon Redshift

Amazon did a deal with ParAccel that amounted to:

Some argue that this is great for ParAccel’s future prospects. I’m not convinced.

No doubt there are and will be Redshift users, evidently including Infor. But so far as I can tell, Redshift uses very standard SQL, so it doesn’t seed a ParAccel market in terms of developer habits. The administration/operation story is similar. So outside of general validation/bragging rights, Redshift is not a big deal for ParAccel.

OEMs and bragging rights

It’s not just Amazon and Infor; there’s also a MicroStrategy deal to OEM ParAccel — I think it’s the real ParAccel software in that case — for a particular service, MicroStrategy Wisdom. But unless I’m terribly mistaken, HP Vertica, Sybase IQ and even Infobright each have a lot more OEMs than ParAccel, just as they have a lot more customers than ParAccel overall.

This OEM success is a great validation for the idea of columnar analytic RDBMS in general, but I don’t see where it’s an advantage for ParAccel vs. the columnar leaders. Read more

February 17, 2013

Notes and links, February 17, 2013

1. It boggles my mind that some database technology companies still don’t view compression as a major issue. Compression directly affects storage and bandwidth usage alike — for all kinds of storage (potentially including RAM) and for all kinds of bandwidth (network, I/O, and potentially on-server).

Trading off less-than-maximal compression so as to minimize CPU impact can make sense. Having no compression at all, however, is an admission of defeat.

2. People tend to misjudge Hadoop’s development pace in either of two directions. An overly expansive view is to note that some people working on Hadoop are trying to make it be all things for all people, and to somehow imagine those goals will soon be achieved. An overly narrow view is to note an important missing feature in Hadoop, and think there’s a big business to be made out of offering it alone.

At this point, I’d guess that Cloudera and Hortonworks have 500ish employees combined, many of whom are engineers. That allows for a low double-digit number of 5+ person engineering teams, along with a number of smaller projects. The most urgently needed features are indeed being built. On the other hand, a complete monument to computing will not soon emerge.

3. Schooner’s acquisition by SanDisk has led to the discontinuation of Schooner’s SQL DBMS SchoonerSQL. Schooner’s flash-optimized key-value store Membrain continues. I don’t have details, but the Membrain web page suggests both data store and cache use cases.

4. There’s considerable personnel movement at Boston-area database technology companies right now. Please ping me directly if you care.

Read more

February 5, 2013

Comments on Gartner’s 2012 Magic Quadrant for Data Warehouse Database Management Systems — evaluations

To my taste, the most glaring mis-rankings in the 2012/2013 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Data Warehouse Database Management are that it is too positive on Kognitio and too negative on Infobright. Secondarily, it is too negative on HP Vertica, and too positive on ParAccel and Actian/VectorWise. So let’s consider those vendors first.

Gartner seems confused about Kognitio’s products and history alike.

Gartner is correct, however, to note that Kognitio doesn’t sell much stuff overall.

* non-existent

In the cases of HP Vertica, Infobright, ParAccel, and Actian/VectorWise, the 2012 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Data Warehouse Database Management’s facts are fairly accurate, but I dispute Gartner’s evaluation. When it comes to Vertica: Read more

December 9, 2012

Amazon Redshift and its implications

Merv Adrian and Doug Henschen both reported more details about Amazon Redshift than I intend to; see also the comments on Doug’s article. I did talk with Rick Glick of ParAccel a bit about the project, and he noted:

“We didn’t want to do the deal on those terms” comments from other companies suggest ParAccel’s main financial take from the deal is an already-reported venture investment.

The cloud-related engineering was mainly around communications, e.g. strengthening error detection/correction to make up for the lack of dedicated switches. In general, Rick seemed more positive on running in the (Amazon) cloud than analytic RDBMS vendors have been in the past.

So who should and will use Amazon Redshift? For starters, I’d say: Read more

December 9, 2012

ParAccel update

In connection with Amazon’s Redshift announcement, ParAccel reached out, and so I talked with them for the first time in a long while. At the highest level:

There wasn’t time for a lot of technical detail, but I gather that the bit about working alongside other data stores:

Also, it seems that ParAccel:

Read more

June 19, 2012

Hadoop distributions: CDH 4, HDP 1, Hadoop 2.0, Hadoop 1.0 and all that

This is part of a four-post series, covering:

The posts depend on each other in various ways.

My clients at Cloudera and Hortonworks have somewhat different views as to the maturity of various pieces of Hadoop technology. In particular:

*”CDH” stands, due to some trademarking weirdness, for “Cloudera’s Distribution including Apache Hadoop”. “HDP” stands for “Hortonworks Data Platform”.

Read more

June 16, 2012

Metamarkets’ back-end technology

This is part of a three-post series:

The canonical Metamarkets batch ingest pipeline is a bit complicated.

By “get data read to be put into Druid” I mean:

That metadata is what goes into the MySQL database, which also retains data about shards that have been invalidated. (That part is needed because of the MVCC.)

By “build the data segments” I mean:

When things are being done that way, Druid may be regarded as comprising three kinds of servers: Read more

April 24, 2012

Notes on the Hadoop and HBase markets

I visited my clients at Cloudera and Hortonworks last week, along with scads of other companies. A few of the takeaways were:

May 24, 2011

Quick thoughts on Oracle-on-Amazon

Amazon has a page up for what it calls Amazon RDS for Oracle Database. You can rent Amazon instances suitable for running Oracle, and bring your own license (BYOL), or you can rent a “License Included” instance that includes Oracle Standard Edition One (a cheap version of Oracle that is limited to two sockets).

My quick thoughts start:

Of course, those are all standard observations every time something that’s basically on-premises software is offered in the cloud. They’re only reinforced by the fact that the only Oracle software Amazon can actually license you is a particularly low-end edition.

And Oracle is indeed on-premises software. In particular, Oracle is hard enough to manage when it’s on your premises, with a known hardware configuration; who would want to try to manage a production instance of Oracle in the cloud?

July 6, 2010

Cassandra technical overview

Back in March, I talked with Jonathan Ellis of Rackspace, who runs the Apache Cassandra project. I started drafting a blog post then, but never put it up. Then Jonathan cofounded Riptano, a company to commercialize Cassandra, and so I talked with him again in May. Well, I’m finally finding time to clear my Cassandra/Riptano backlog. I’ll cover the more technical parts below, and the more business- or usage-oriented ones in a companion Cassandra/Riptano post.

Jonathan’s core claims for Cassandra include:

In general, Jonathan positions Cassandra as being best-suited to handle a small number of operations at high volume, throughput, and speed. The rest of what you do, as far as he’s concerned, may well belong in a more traditional SQL DBMS.  Read more

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