October 26, 2015

Sources of differentiation

Obviously, a large fraction of what I write about involves technical differentiation. So let’s try for a framework where differentiation claims can be placed in context. This post will get through the generalities. The sequels will apply them to specific cases.

Many buying and design considerations for IT fall into six interrelated areas:  Read more

October 15, 2015

Cassandra and privacy requirements

For starters:

But when I made that connection and checked in accordingly with my client Patrick McFadin at DataStax, I discovered that I’d been a little confused about how multi-data-center Cassandra works. The basic idea holds water, but the details are not quite what I was envisioning.

The story starts:

In particular, a remote replication factor for Cassandra can = 0. When that happens, then you have data sitting in one geographical location that is absent from another geographical location; i.e., you can be in compliance with laws forbidding the export of certain data. To be clear (and this contradicts what I previously believed and hence also implied in this blog):

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October 15, 2015

Basho and Riak

Basho was on my (very short) blacklist of companies with whom I refuse to speak, because they have lied about the contents of previous conversations. But Tony Falco et al. are long gone from the company. So when Basho’s new management team reached out, I took the meeting.

For starters:

Basho’s product line has gotten a bit confusing, but as best I understand things the story is:

Technical notes on some of that include:  Read more

October 15, 2015

Couchbase 4.0 and related subjects

I last wrote about Couchbase in November, 2012, around the time of Couchbase 2.0. One of the many new features I mentioned then was secondary indexing. Ravi Mayuram just checked in to tell me about Couchbase 4.0. One of the important new features he mentioned was what I think he said was Couchbase’s “first version” of secondary indexing. Obviously, I’m confused.

Now that you’re duly warned, let me remind you of aspects of Couchbase timeline.

Technical notes on Couchbase 4.0 — and related riffs :) — start: Read more

October 11, 2015

Notes on privacy and surveillance, October 11, 2015

1. European Union data sovereignty laws have long had a “Safe Harbour” rule stating it was OK to ship data to the US. Per the case Maximilian Schrems v Data Protection Commissioner, this rule is now held to be invalid. Angst has ensued, and rightly so.

The core technical issues are roughly:

Facebook’s estimate of billions of dollars in added costs is not easy to refute.

My next set of technical thoughts starts: Read more

October 7, 2015

Notes on packaged applications (including SaaS)

1. The rise of SAP (and later Siebel Systems) was greatly helped by Anderson Consulting, even before it was split off from the accounting firm and renamed as Accenture. My main contact in that group was Rob Kelley, but it’s possible that Brian Sommer was even more central to the industry-watching part of the operation. Brian is still around, and he just leveled a blast at the ERP* industry, which I encourage you to read. I agree with most of it.

*Enterprise Resource Planning

Brian’s argument, as I interpret it, boils down mainly to two points:

I’d add that SaaS (Software As A Service)/on-premises tensions aren’t helping incumbent vendors either.

But no article addresses all the subjects it ideally should, and I’d like to call out two omissions. First, what Brian said is in many cases applicable just to large and/or internet-first companies. Plenty of smaller, more traditional businesses could get by just fine with no more functionality than is in “Big ERP” today, if we stipulate that it should be:

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October 5, 2015

Consumer data management

Don’t plan to fish in your personal data lake.

Perhaps the biggest mess in all of IT is the management of individual consumers’ data. Our electronic data is thoroughly scattered. Most individual portions are poorly managed. There’s no integration. The data that’s on paper is even worse. For example:

For the most part, the technology community is barely trying to solve those problems. But even when it does try, success is mixed at best. For example:

And those are some of the most successful names.

There are numerous reasons for this dismal state of affairs.  Read more

September 28, 2015

The potential significance of Cloudera Kudu

This is part of a three-post series on Kudu, a new data storage system from Cloudera.

Combined with Impala, Kudu is (among other things) an attempt to build a no-apologies analytic DBMS (DataBase Management System) into Hadoop. My reactions to that start:

I’ll expand on that last point. Analytics is no longer just about fast queries on raw or simply-aggregated data. Data transformation is getting ever more complex — that’s true in general, and it’s specifically true in the case of transformations that need to happen in human real time. Predictive models now often get rescored on every click. Sometimes, they even get retrained at short intervals. And while data reduction in the sense of “event extraction from high-volume streams” isn’t that a big deal yet in commercial apps featuring machine-generated data — if growth trends continue as much of us expect, it’s only a matter of time before that changes.

Of course, this is all a bullish argument for Spark (or Flink, if I’m wrong to dismiss its chances as a Spark competitor). But it also all requires strong low-latency analytic data underpinnings, and I suspect that several kinds of data subsystem will prosper. I expect Kudu-supported Hadoop/Spark to be a strong contender for that role, along with the best of the old-school analytic RDBMS, Tachyon-supported Spark, one or more contenders from the Hana/MemSQL crowd (i.e., memory-centric RDBMS that purport to be good at analytics and transactions alike), and of course also whatever Cloudera’s strongest competitor(s) choose to back.

September 28, 2015

Cloudera Kudu deep dive

This is part of a three-post series on Kudu, a new data storage system from Cloudera.

Let’s talk in more detail about how Kudu stores data.

Read more

September 28, 2015

Introduction to Cloudera Kudu

This is part of a three-post series on Kudu, a new data storage system from Cloudera.

Cloudera is introducing a new open source project, Kudu,* which from Cloudera’s standpoint is meant to eventually become the single best underpinning for analytics on the Hadoop stack. I’ve spent multiple hours discussing Kudu with Cloudera, mainly with Todd Lipcon. Any errors are of course entirely mine.

*Like the impala, the kudu is a kind of antelope. I knew that, because I enjoy word games. What I didn’t know — and which is germane to the naming choice — is that the kudu has stripes. :)

For starters:

Read more

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