February 8, 2011

Membase and CouchOne merged to form Couchbase

Membase, the company whose product is Membase and whose former company name is Northscale, has merged with CouchOne, the company whose product is CouchDB and whose former name is Couch.io. The result (product and company) will be called Couchbase. CouchDB inventor Damien Katz will join the Membase (now Couchbase) management team as CTO. Couchbase can reasonably be regarded as a document-oriented NoSQL DBMS, a product category I not coincidentally posted about yesterday.

In essence, Couchbase will be CouchDB with scale-out. Alternatively, Couchbase will be Membase with a richer programming interface. The Couchbase sweet spot is likely to be: 

And now let’s go to the lists of bullet points.

Background to the Membase/CouchDB/Couchbase integration story:

Highlights of how Membase works and is deployed today:

Business background on Couchbase predecessors:

Happy talk around Membase/CouchDB/Couchbase product integration:

Other technical notes:

Finally, I’m curious about the relative performance of Couchbase/Membase and Schooner Membrain when using flash memory. I would guess that the comparison favors Schooner, because of Schooner’s extensive focus on flash optimization. I would also guess that Schooner’s edge is small, because I’d think it would be less than Schooner’s advantage vs. alternative Flash uses on the MySQL side, and Schooner’s MySQL performance advantage seems to be less than 2X even when Schooner is doing the benchmarks.

Comments

2 Responses to “Membase and CouchOne merged to form Couchbase”

  1. M-A-O-L » Membase and CouchOne merged to form Couchbase on February 8th, 2011 7:20 am

    [...] the NoSQL Consolidation Wars begin: Membase and CouchOne merged to form Couchbase. In essence, Couchbase will be CouchDB with scale-out. Alternatively, Couchbase will be Membase [...]

  2. Jerry Rudisin on February 11th, 2011 2:11 pm

    You ask a question about the performance of Membase versus Schooner Membrain when using flash memory. Schooner is faster as you suggest, but I think that the more interesting comparison is what happens with a data set that does not fit into the server’s DRAM? Schooner’s premise is that by cleverly exploiting, say, 1 TB of flash memory on a system with 64 GB of DRAM, you can avoid sharding and get very high performance from the full complement of flash. We have some benchmarks at http://www.schoonerinfotech.com/products/schooner_membrain showing Membase and Membrain.

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