MapReduce

Analysis of implementations of and issues associated with the parallel programming framework MapReduce. Related subjects include:

December 13, 2012

Spark, Shark, and RDDs — technology notes

Spark and Shark are interesting alternatives to MapReduce and Hive. At a high level:

The key concept here seems to be the RDD. Any one RDD:

Otherwise, there’s a lot of flexibility; an RDD can be a set of tuples, a collection of XML documents, or whatever other reasonable kind of dataset you want. And I gather that:

Read more

December 13, 2012

Introduction to Spark, Shark, BDAS and AMPLab

UC Berkeley’s AMPLab is working on a software stack that:

The whole thing has $30 million in projected funding (half government, half industry) and a 6-year plan (which they’re 2 years into).

Specific projects of note in all that include:

Read more

November 29, 2012

Notes on Microsoft SQL Server

I’ve been known to gripe that covering big companies such as Microsoft is hard. Still, Doug Leland of Microsoft’s SQL Server team checked in for phone calls in August and again today, and I think I got enough to be worth writing about, albeit at a survey level only,

Subjects I’ll mention include:

One topic I can’t yet comment about is MOLAP/ROLAP, which is a pity; if anybody can refute my claim that ROLAP trumps MOLAP, it’s either Microsoft or Oracle.

Microsoft’s slides mentioned Yahoo refining a 6 petabyte Hadoop cluster into a 24 terabyte SQL Server “cube”, which was surprising in light of Yahoo’s history as an Oracle reference.

Read more

November 19, 2012

Couchbase 2.0

My clients at Couchbase checked in.

The big changes in Couchbase 2.0 versus the previous (1.8.x) version are:

Couchbase 2.0 is upwards-compatible with prior versions of Couchbase (and hence with Memcached), but not with CouchDB.

Technology notes on Couchbase 2.0 include: Read more

November 19, 2012

Incremental MapReduce

My clients at Cloudant, Couchbase, and 10gen/MongoDB (Edit: See Alex Popescu’s comment below) all boast the feature incremental MapReduce. (And they’re not the only ones.) So I feel like making a quick post about it. For starters, I’ll quote myself about Cloudant:

The essence of Cloudant’s incremental MapReduce seems to be that data is selected only if it’s been updated since the last run. Obviously, this only works for MapReduce algorithms whose eventual output can be run on different subsets of the target data set, then aggregated in a simple way.

These implementations of incremental MapReduce are hacked together by teams vastly smaller than those working on Hadoop, and surely fall short of Hadoop in many areas such as performance, fault-tolerance, and language support. That’s a given. Still, if the jobs are short and simple, those deficiencies may be tolerable.

A StackOverflow thread about MongoDB’s version of incremental MapReduce highlights some of the implementation challenges.

But all practicality aside, let’s return to the point that incremental MapReduce only works for some kinds of MapReduce-based algorithms, and consider how much of a limitation that really is. Looking at the Map steps sheds a little light: Read more

November 1, 2012

More on Cloudera Impala

What I wrote before about Cloudera Impala was quite incomplete. After a followup call, I now feel I have a better handle on the whole thing.

First, some basics:

The general technical idea of Impala is:

Read more

October 29, 2012

Introduction to Continuuity

I chatted with Todd Papaioannou about his new company Continuuity. Todd is as handy at combining buzzwords as he is at concatenating vowels, and so Continuuity — with two “U”s —  is making a big data fabric platform as a service with REST APIs that runs over Hadoop and HBase in the private or public clouds. I found the whole thing confusing, in that:

But all confusion aside, there are some interesting aspects to Continuuity. Read more

October 24, 2012

Quick notes on Impala

Edit: There is now a follow-up post on Cloudera Impala with substantially more detail.

In my world it’s possible to have a hasty 2-hour conversation, and that’s exactly what I had with Cloudera last week. We touched on hardware and general adoption, but much of the conversation was about Cloudera Impala, announced today. Like Hive, Impala turns Hadoop into a basic analytic RDBMS, with similar SQL/Hadoop integration benefits to those of Hadapt. In particular:

Beyond that: Read more

October 24, 2012

Introduction to Cirro

Stuart Frost, of DATAllegro fame, has started a small family of companies, and they’ve become my clients sort of as a group. The first one that I’m choosing to write about is Cirro, for which the basics are:

Data federation stories are often hard to understand because, until you drill down, they implausibly sound as if they do anything for everybody. That said, it’s reasonable to think of Cirro as a layer between Hadoop and your BI tool that:

In both cases, Cirro is calling on your data management software for help, RDBMS or Hadoop as the case may be.

More precisely, Cirro’s approach is: Read more

October 16, 2012

Hadapt Version 2

My clients at Hadapt are coming out with a Version 2 to be available in Q1 2013, and perhaps slipstreaming some of the features before then. At that point, it will be reasonable to regard Hadapt as offering:

Solr is in the mix as well.

Hadapt+Hadoop is positioned much more as “better than Hadoop” than “a better scale-out RDBMS”– and rightly so, due to its limitations when viewed strictly from an analytic RDBMS standpoint. I.e., Hadapt is meant for enterprises that want to do several of:

Hadapt has 6 or so production customers, a dozen or so more coming online soon, 35 or so employees (mainly in Cambridge or Poland), reasonable amounts of venture capital, and the involvement of a variety of industry luminaries. Hadapt’s biggest installation seems to have 10s of terabytes of relational data and 100s of TBs of multi-structured; Hadapt is very confident in its ability to scale an order of magnitude beyond that with the Version 2 product, and reasonably confident it could go even further.

At the highest level, Hadapt works like this: Read more

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