DataStax

Discussion of DataStax — formerly known as Riptano — a company founded to commercialize Cassandra.

September 8, 2011

Aster Data business trends

Last month, I reviewed with the Aster Data folks which markets they were targeting and selling into, subsequent to acquisition by their new orange overlords. The answers aren’t what they used to be. Aster no longer focuses much on what it used to call frontline (i.e., low-latency, operational) applications; those are of course a key strength for Teradata. Rather, Aster focuses on investigative analytics — they’ve long endorsed my use of the term — and on the batch run/scoring kinds of applications that inform operational systems.

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May 14, 2011

Alternatives for Hadoop/MapReduce data storage and management

There’s been a flurry of announcements recently in the Hadoop world. Much of it has been concentrated on Hadoop data storage and management. This is understandable, since HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System) is quite a young (i.e. immature) system, with much strengthening and Bottleneck Whack-A-Mole remaining in its future.

Known HDFS and Hadoop data storage and management issues include but are not limited to:

Different entities have different ideas about how such deficiencies should be addressed.  Read more

March 23, 2011

DataStax introduces a Cassandra-based Hadoop distribution called Brisk

Cassandra company DataStax is introducing a Hadoop distribution called Brisk, for use cases that combine short-request and analytic processing. Brisk in essence replaces HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System) with a Cassandra-based file system called CassandraFS. The whole thing is due to be released (Apache open source) within the next 45 days.

The core claims for Cassandra/Brisk/CassandraFS are:

There’s a pretty good white paper around all this, which also recites general Cassandra claims – [edit] and here at last is the link.

February 1, 2011

Cassandra company DataStax (formerly Riptano) is on track

Riptano, the Cassandra company, has changed its name to DataStax. DataStax has opened headquarters in Burlingame and hired some database-experienced folks – notably Ben Werther from Greenplum and Michael Weir from ParAccel, with Zenobia Godschalk (who worked with Aster Data) somewhere in the outside PR mix. Other than that, what’s new at DataStax is pretty much what could have been expected based on what DataStax folks said last spring.

Most notably, DataStax is introducing a software offering, whose full name is DataStax OpsCenter for Apache Cassandra. DataStax OpsCenter for Apache Cassandra seems to be, in essence, a monitoring tool for Cassandra clusters, with a bit of capacity planning bundled in. (If there are any outright operations parts to DataStax OpsCenter, they got overlooked in our conversation.)* Read more

August 26, 2010

More on NoSQL and HVSP (or OLRP)

Since posting last Wednesday morning that I’m looking into NoSQL and HVSP, I’ve had a lot of conversations, including with (among others):

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July 6, 2010

Riptano, and Cassandra adoption

Tonight’s Cassandra technology post got plenty long enough on its own, so I’m separating out business and adoption issues here. For starters, known Cassandra users include:

Fetlife, Meebo, and others seem to at least have a healthy interest in Cassandra, based on their level of involvement in a forthcoming Cassandra Summit. That said, the @Fetlife tweetstream features numerous yelps of pain, and I don’t mean the recreational kind.  Read more

July 6, 2010

Cassandra technical overview

Back in March, I talked with Jonathan Ellis of Rackspace, who runs the Apache Cassandra project. I started drafting a blog post then, but never put it up. Then Jonathan cofounded Riptano, a company to commercialize Cassandra, and so I talked with him again in May. Well, I’m finally finding time to clear my Cassandra/Riptano backlog. I’ll cover the more technical parts below, and the more business- or usage-oriented ones in a companion Cassandra/Riptano post.

Jonathan’s core claims for Cassandra include:

In general, Jonathan positions Cassandra as being best-suited to handle a small number of operations at high volume, throughput, and speed. The rest of what you do, as far as he’s concerned, may well belong in a more traditional SQL DBMS.  Read more

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