PostgreSQL

Analysis of open source database management system PostgreSQL and other products in the PostgreSQL ecosystem. Related subjects include:

November 8, 2011

Hadapt is moving forward

I’ve talked with my clients at Hadapt a couple of times recently. News highlights include:

The Hadapt product story hasn’t changed significantly from what it was before. Specific points I can add include:   Read more

July 6, 2011

Hadapt update

I met with the Hadapt guys today.  I think I can be a bit crisper than before in positioning Hadapt and its use cases, namely:

Other evolution from what I wrote about Hadapt a few months ago includes:

In other news, Hadapt is our newest client.

March 23, 2011

Hadapt (commercialized HadoopDB)

The HadoopDB company Hadapt is finally launching, based on the HadoopDB project, albeit with code rewritten from scratch. As you may recall, the core idea of HadoopDB is to put a DBMS on every node, and use MapReduce to talk to the whole database. The idea is to get the same SQL/MapReduce integration as you get if you use Hive, but with much better performance* and perhaps somewhat better SQL functionality.** Advantages vs. a DBMS-based analytic platform that includes MapReduce — e.g. Aster Data — are less clear.  Read more

January 20, 2011

Notes, links, and comments January 20, 2011

I haven’t done a pure notes/links/comments post for a while. Let’s fix that now. (A bunch of saved-up links, however, did find their way into my recent privacy threats overview.)

First and foremost, the fourth annual New England Database Summit (nee “Day”) is next week, specifically Friday, January 28. As per my posts in previous years, I think well of the event, which has a friendly, gathering-of-the-clan flavor. Registration is free, but the organizers would prefer that you register online by the end of this week, if you would be so kind.

The two things potentially wrong with the New England Database Summit are parking and the rush hour drive home afterwards. I would listen with interest to any suggestions about dinner plans.

One thing I hope to figure out at the Summit or before is what the hell is going on on Vertica’s blog or, for that matter, at Vertica. The recent Mike Stonebraker post that spawned a lot of discussion and commentary has disappeared. Meanwhile, Vertica has had three consecutive heads of marketing leave the company since June, and I don’t know who to talk to there any more.  Read more

July 28, 2010

dbShards — a lot like an MPP OLTP DBMS based on MySQL or PostgreSQL

I talked yesterday w/ Cory Isaacson, who runs CodeFutures, makers of dbShards. dbShards is a software layer that turns an ordinary DBMS (currently MySQL or PostgreSQL) into an MPP shared-nothing ACID-compliant OLTP DBMS. Technical highlights included:  Read more

May 15, 2010

Stakeholder-facing analytics

There’s a point I keep making in speeches, and used to keep making in white papers, yet have almost never spelled out in this blog. Let me now (somewhat) correct the oversight.

Analytic technology isn’t only for you. It’s also for your customers, citizens, and other stakeholders.

I am not referring here to what is well understood to be an important, fast-growing activity — providing data and its analysis to customers as your primary or only business — nor to the related business of taking people’s data, crunching it for them, and giving them results. That combined sector — which I am pretty alone in aggregating into one and calling data mart outsourcing — is one of the top several vertical markets for a lot of the analytic DBMS vendors I write about. Rather, I’m talking about enterprises that gather data for some primary purpose, and have discovered that a good secondary use of the data is to reflect it back to stakeholders, often the same ones who provided or created it in the first place.

For now I’ll call this category stakeholder-facing analytics, as the shorter phrase “stakeholder analytics” would be ambiguous.* I first picked up the idea early this decade from Information Builders, for whom it had become something of a specialty. I’ve been asking analytics vendors for examples of stakeholder-facing analytics ever since, and a number have been able to comply. But the whole thing is in its early days even so; almost any sufficiently large enterprise should be more active in stakeholder-facing analytics than it currently is.
Read more

April 5, 2010

Notes on the evolution of OLTP database management systems

The past few years have seen a spate of startups in the analytic DBMS business. Netezza, Vertica, Greenplum, Aster Data and others are all reasonably prosperous, alongside older specialty product vendors Teradata and Sybase (the Sybase IQ part).  OLTP (OnLine Transaction Processing) and general purpose DBMS startups, however, have not yet done as well, with such success as there has been (MySQL, Intersystems Cache’, solidDB’s exit, etc.) generally accruing to products that originated in the 20th Century.

Nonetheless, OLTP/general-purpose data management startup activity has recently picked up, targeting what I see as some very real opportunities and needs. So as a jumping-off point for further writing, I thought it might be interesting to collect a few observations about the market in one place.  These include:

I shall explain. Read more

October 19, 2009

Greenplum Single-Node Edition — sometimes free is a real cool price

Greenplum is announcing today that you can run Greenplum software on a single 8-core commodity server, free. First and foremost, that’s a strong statement that Greenplum wants enterprises to pay it for Greenplum’s parallelization/”private cloud” capabilities. Second, it may be an attractive gift to a variety of folks who want to extract insight from terabyte-scale databases of various kinds.

Greenplum Single-Node Edition:

For those who want free, terabyte-scale data warehousing software, Greenplum Single-Node Edition may be quite appealing, considering that the main available alternatives are:

For example, comparing PostgreSQL-based Greenplum with PostgreSQL itself, Greenplum offers:

Read more

September 13, 2009

HadoopDB

Despite a thoughtful heads-up from Daniel Abadi at the time of his original posting about HadoopDB, I’m just getting around to writing about it now. HadoopDB is a research project carried out by a couple of Abadi’s students. Further research is definitely planned. But it seems too early to say that HadoopDB will ever get past the “research and oh by the way the code is open sourced” stage and become a real code line — whether commercialized, open source, or both.

The basic idea of HadoopDB is to put copies of a DBMS at different nodes of a grid, and use Hadoop to parcel work among them. Major benefits when compared with massively parallel DBMS are said to be:

HadoopDB has actually been built with PostgreSQL. That version achieved performance well below that of a commercial DBMS “DBX”, where X=2. Column-store guru Abadi has repeatedly signaled his intention to try out HadoopDB with VectorWise at the nodes instead. (Recall that VectorWise is shared-everything.) It will be interesting to see how that configuration performs.

The real opportunity for HadoopDB, however, in my opinion may lie elsewhere. Read more

September 10, 2009

What could or should make Oracle/MySQL antitrust concerns go away?

When the Oracle/MySQL deal was first announced, I wrote:

I can probably come up with business practices that could make things very hard on Oracle/MySQL competitors … but I haven’t found a compelling antitrust trigger on my first pass over the subject.

Subsequently, there’s been a lot of discussion about whether or not Oracle can use control of MySQL to make life difficult for third-party MySQL storage engine vendors.

Now that the European Commission is delaying the Oracle/Sun deal, explicitly because of Oracle/MySQL antitrust fears.  That is, the European Commission wants to be reassured that an Oracle takeover of MySQL won’t unduly impinge upon the future availability of open source/low cost DBMS alternatives.  This raises that natural question:

What could Oracle do to assure concerned parties that its ownership of MySQL won’t unduly hamper open-source-based DBMS competition?

I think that’s indeed the crucial question. The Oracle/Sun deal has enough momentum at this point that it both should and will be allowed to happen — perhaps with safeguards — rather than banned outright. If  you have concerns about Oracle’s pending acquisition of MySQL, you should speak up and outline what kinds of regulatory safeguards would alleviate the problems you foresee.

More or less obvious possibilities include:

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